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24HRS (curator Jo Lloyd)

2010

Natalie was invited by Jo Lloyd to make work for her 24HRS project - presented by Dancehouse. Natalie was one of four choreographers who were challenged to create and present a new work within a 24 hour period.

Image of Michelle Heaven, Trevor Patrick and Gerard Van Dyck by Belinda Strodder

Image of Michelle Heaven, Trevor Patrick and Gerard Van Dyck by Belinda Strodder

people

Choreographer

Natalie Cursio

Visual Artist / Set Design

Ash Keating

Performers /collaborators

Michelle Heaven
Trevor Patrick
Gerard Van Dyck

Lighting Design

Gwen Holmberg-Gilchrist

season

Dancehouse
April 30, 2011

Other choreographers engaged in the 24HRS project were Shelley Lasica (May 7), Phillip Adams (May 14) and Luke George (May 21).

Image of Michelle Heaven, Trevor Patrick and Gerard Van Dyck by Belinda Strodder

Image of Michelle Heaven, Trevor Patrick and Gerard Van Dyck by Belinda Strodder

reviews / writings

"Natalie Cursio’s work was a messy installation of recycled waste in which a series of fertile scenarios sprouted. The three dancers worked around clear moments in which power dynamics shifted or relationships reformed themselves; within this framework there was still a loose sense of play and spontaneity which tapped the tight time restrictions to produce a charming liveliness."
John Bailey, REAL TIME 2010

"Natalie Cursio was up first and went at it with vigour: a wasteland of recycled refuse was the staging ground for a series of intimate scenes between three dancers (with occasional solos and duets). It was clear that the choreographer hadn't tried to create a strict sequence of steps for the dancers to follow but had set up situations instead, and this gave the performers some interpretative space within which to play. What made it most effective for me was that Cursio's work appeared to have focused on particular dynamics or relationships between the dancers, so there were palpable moments of connection, rejection, interruption and release. It wasn't expressive dance, per se, but there was a level of humanism involved that allowed a really strong entry point into the work."
John Bailey, CAPITAL IDEA 2010